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By Michael Guerra, DPM
July 31, 2019
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Sprained Ankle  

Signs and Treatment for Sprained Ankles

Do you have a sprained ankle? Ankle sprains are among the most common injuries. Ankle sprains sprain occur when the ligaments in the ankle are stretched or torn. Ankle sprains can be very painful and incapacitating. If you have an ankle sprain, it's a good idea to see your podiatrist. Read on to to learn about the signs and treatment for sprained ankles.

Signs You Have a Sprained Ankle

1. Pain: An ankle sprain can be painful and can make it hard to carry out your day-to-day activities. You may also feel discomfort when you place weight on the affected area. The pain may worsen when the area is pressed and during standing or walking.

2. Redness: A sprained ankle can cause warmth and redness around the affected area. If your ankle is warm, red, and swollen, it is inflamed. Warmth and redness is caused by increased blood flow to the area.

3. Swelling: When an ankle is injured with a sprain, inflammation occurs. Swelling is the body’s protective response to an injury. Inflammation occurs because of increased fluid in the tissue. This is a normal reaction of the body and is the start of the healing process. However, sometimes the body produces more swelling that necessary.

4. Bruising: A sprained ankle causes bruising around the affected joint. A contusion, commonly known as a bruise, is made up of blood beneath the skin. A bruise results in a discoloration of the skin. Bruising is a result of injury to the blood vessels in the skin.

5. Stiffness: A sprained ankle causes limited range of motion and stiffness. Inflammation and pain often limit movement after the injury. Your podiatrist may advise against moving the ankle to allow your ankle to heal. Your podiatrist may also design an exercise program to reduce stiffness after the injury.

Treating a Sprained Ankle

1. Rest your ankle: All ankle sprains require a period of rest. Resting your ankle will allow the healing process to begin. Stay off your feet to allow your ankle to heal. Gently exercise your ankle on a regular basis to reduce stiffness. Avoid strenuous activites, such as running and aerobics, until you can walk without it causing any pain.

2. Elevate your ankle: Keep your ankle raised above the level of your chest for several days after injury. Use pillows to keep your foot elevated. Keep your foot elevated for a few hours per day until your ankle stops swelling. Elevation is important after an injury as it helps to reduce the amount of blood flow to the injured area. This helps to reduce the inflammation, bruising, and pain.

3. Ice your ankle: Ice treatment can help decrease pain, swelling, bruising, and muscle spasms. To make an ice pack, fill a freezer bag with ice. Put an ice pack on your injured ankle for 10 minutes every 2 hours. Wrap an elastic medical bandage around the ice pack to hold it in place. You should not use ice for more than 20 minutes at a time. If you have circulation issues or diabetes, talk to your doctor before applying ice.

4. Compress your ankle: Apply a compression bandage from the toes to above the ankle. Wrapping your ankle will help to avoid bruising and swelling. Wrap the bandage around your ankle and foot, and secure it with medical tape. Make sure the bandage doesn't restrict blood flow to your toes or make the pain worse. Do combine compression with elevationa and rest whenever possible.

5. Take a pain reliever: If you have severe pain, a narcotic pain reliever can make you feel better. An OTC pain reliever may also help reduce the pain and swelling. Most medical professionals recommend anti-inflammatory medicines such as naproxen, ibuprofen, or ketoprofen. You can also take acetaminophen for pain, although this medicine does not reduce inflammation. Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label.

6. See a doctor: A podiatrist can diagnose and treat an ankle sprain. Your doctor may order x-rays to determine if you have a broken bone in your ankle. You may receive an ankle brace to keep your ankle from moving and allow ligaments to heal. Your doctor will also give you medications to reduce swelling and pain. Once you can bear weight without increased pain, your doctor will add strengthening exercises to your treatment plan.

Whether your goal is getting back to work, hobbies, sports, the gym, or just enjoying life, a podiatrist can help. If you have an ankle sprain, search for a podiatrist in your area and schedule an appointment. A podiatrist can help you get back on track in no time!

By Michael Guerra, DPM
July 19, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Heel Pain  

If jogging, walking, or even just standing causes a sharp pain in your heel, you may have plantar fasciitis—an inflammation of the foot's Heel Painconnective tissue that is most evident in the morning or following exercise. The condition can make everyday activities painful and difficult, but with the help of Michael Guerra, DPM, of Burlington Podiatry in Burlington, VT, your feet can soon be feeling great once again!

 

What causes heel pain?

The plantar fascia ligament, a tissue that attaches your heel bone to your toes, can become irritated for many reasons, including wearing shoes without proper supports, carrying heavy amounts of weight, or doing repetitive foot exercises. Additionally, if you have flat feet, high arches, or tight calf muscles you may be more susceptible to heel pain. If you are suffering from plantar fasciitis, the bottom of your foot will likely feel tender, with pain centralized on the underside of your heel.

 

What our Burlington office can do for your pain

Depending on the severity of your heel pain, your podiatrist may try or recommend one or more of the following:

  • Shock wave therapy ( EPAT)
  • Massaging and icing of the area to reduce inflammation and dull pain
  • Physical therapy exercises to relax the tissues around the heel bone, including stair, towel, slant board and dynamic stretches
  • Anti-inflammatory medications
  • Custom orthotic shoe inserts to reduce strain and irritation
  • Cortisone injections to decrease inflammation
  • Night splints to keep your heel stretched out as you sleep
  • Shock wave therapy to inflict micro trauma on your tissue and stimulate it to heal
  • Abstaining from weight-bearing activity

 

Give us a call

If you are suffering from heel pain, contact Michael Guerra, DPM in Burlington at (802) 862-8666 today.

By Michael Guerra, DPM
June 28, 2019
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Hammertoes  

A hammertoe is a common foot deformity that affects the middle joint of the smaller toes. As a result, this causes the toes to bend downward. Since this bend causes the joint to stick out this can put more pressure on the affected joints when wearing shoes, which can also make the deformity worse over time. As with most foot deformities a hammertoe will start out minor and continue to progress over time if left untreated.

During the earlier stages you may not notice much pain and discomfort. In fact the only way you may be able to tell that you have a hammertoe is by examining the foot and noticing that the small toes bend downward like a claw. Of course, at this stage the deformed joint is still flexible enough to be straightened out.

However, if the deformity progresses this can cause the joint to become rigid, which won’t respond effectively to simple conservative treatments. As you might imagine, the sooner you see a podiatrist to treat your hammertoe the better. Early intervention is key, as a hammertoe will not get better without the proper care.

Hammertoes are often the result of an imbalance in the muscle or tendon of the foot. Over time, this leads to structural changes in the foot. Genetics may also play a role in whether your feet are at risk for this deformity. A hammertoe can also be made worse by wearing shoes that are too tight and put too much pressure on the toes.

Along with the structural changes that occur with hammertoes it’s also common to experience redness, inflammation or the development of a corn or callus on the toe. If you are noticing symptoms of a hammertoe see your podiatrist for an evaluation. A simple physical exam is usually all that’s needed to diagnose a hammertoe; however, sometimes an x-ray will be performed in order to determine the extent of the deformity.

If you are dealing with a flexible hammertoe, more often than not simple nonsurgical treatment options are all that’s needed. Following simple treatment options and care can prevent the hammertoes from becoming rigid or painful. Some nonsurgical treatment options include:

  • Wearing the appropriate footwear. This means wearing shoes that aren’t pointy or have high heels, which can put more pressure on the toes.
  • Placing custom orthotics into your shoes, which can ease discomfort and prevent pain resulting in a muscular imbalance.
  • Taking over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen, which can reduce both pain and inflammation.
  • Splinting the toe or toes to keep them straight, which can also reduce stiffness, inflammation and pain.
  • Applying protective non-medicated padding over the top of the toe to prevent a corn or callus from developing.

If your hammertoe is painful or rigid then you may need to discuss whether surgery is the best option for alleviating your symptom and correcting the deformity. If you are dealing with a hammertoe turn to a foot specialist for help.

By Michael Guerra, DPM
May 31, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Diabetic Feet  

Diabetic feet need special care because of decreased circulation, neuropathy, joint deterioration, and more. While your primary care physician may guide you on blood sugar control, medications, a healthy diet, and active lifestyle, your podiatrist assesses and treats how your feet and ankles function everyday and for the long term. Enlist their help in the health maintenance of your diabetic feet.

Keeping ahead of neuropathy and avoiding amputation

Those are two key goals of diabetic foot care. Your podiatrist will want to see you regularly to assess the color, temperature, sensation, function, and shape of your feet and ankles, noting any developing problems. Early detection of circulation issues, nerve degeneration (neuropathy), and deformities, such as hammertoes, bunions, and Charcot Foot, are key.

Your podiatric foot examination will include an eye-on inspection of your skin (color, temperature, texture, and integrity). Your foot doctor also may perform gait analysis to watch for changes in how you walk. Sometimes a podiatrist orders X-ray imaging or an MRI to view the internal structure of the foot and/or ankle.

Remember, that foot ulcers are the primary threat to the overall health and well-being of the diabetic, says the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Untreated, they may lead to complications so severe amputation is the only option.

What can you do to treat your diabetic feet?

  1. Be proactive. Inspect your feet daily, looking redness or skin breakdown.
  2. Wash and dry your feet daily.
  3. Trim your toenails carefully using a clean clippers. Trim straight across and not too short to avoid ingrown toenails.
  4. Wear shoes at all times--even indoors--to avoid injury.
  5. Wear clean, well-fitting, moisture-wicking socks.
  6. Keep your weight and blood sugars within normal range.
  7. Get in-office treatment of calluses and corns, says the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons.
  8. Avoid all forms of tobacco.
  9. Report any changes to your foot doctor as soon as possible.
  10. See your podiatrist every six months or as he or she directs.

Healthy feet and a healthy you

Podiatric health is so important, but especially to the diabetic. So stay in touch with your foot doctor, and be routinized in your foot care for better long-term health.

By Michael Guerra, DPM
May 15, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: toenail fungus  

Toenail fungus can be incredibly difficult to treat at home, even if you apply over-the-counter products daily. Fortunately, laser treatments toenail fungusfrom your Burlington, VT, podiatrist, Dr. Michael Guerra can help clear your nails with less effort.

Why isn't home treatment helping?

Over-the-counter anti-fungal treatments only reach the outer layers of your toenails. The fungus can lurk deep inside nails and is often present on the skin under the nail. No matter how diligently you apply the product, it may never clear your nail.

How does laser treatment work?

Laser treatment targets the yellow pigment in toenail fungus. The energy from the light beam heats the pigment to help kill the fungal spores. The laser is aimed at only the fungus and doesn't damage any of the surrounding healthy skin.

Does laser nail fungus treatment hurt?

The laser that your Burlington foot doctor uses produces short bursts of laser energy to prevent your toe from becoming too hot. Although you'll notice that your toe feels a little warm or tingles when the laser beam is activated, treatment isn't uncomfortable in the least.

Will my toe look better immediately?

Over the course of 3-4 months a new clear nail will grow out replacing the old discolored nail.

How much downtime will I need?

There is absolutely no downtime needed with laser treatment. After you leave your foot doctor's office, you can go right back to work or continue your usual daily activities!

How can I avoid fungal infections in the future?

You can reduce your risk of developing a new infection by wearing shoes and sandals in locker rooms and other public areas. If someone in your family has toenail fungus, don't share towels, washcloths, shoes or socks. Wash shared bedding often and use the hot water wash cycle.

Fungi thrive in sweaty shoes and other dark, moist environments. Choose shoes made of breathable materials, and alternate the shoes you wear. If your feet perspire heavily, wash your feet and change your socks during the day.

Give us a call!

Are you interested in laser treatment for nail fungus? Call your Burlington, VT, podiatrist, Dr. Michael Guerra, at (802) 862-8666 to schedule an appointment!





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